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  • Erin Howse

    Hi Carolyn

    Thanks for sending me this article about coconut sugar. I’ve been looking for a healthier sugar substitute for a while and been pretty disappointed with the offerings. Issues of price & supply have been difficult to negotiate, but I think you’ve just given me my first glimpse of success. Will certainly be trying the product & reporting back.

    • Carolyn Simon, Naturopath

      Hi Erin

      Great to get your positive response, we look forward to you sharing some of your coconut sugar successes with us!

      best wishes
      Carolyn

    • Many thanks Erin 🙂

  • Kelly Reynolds

    Hi, how does coconut sugar compare to stevia?

    • Carolyn Simon, Naturopath

      Hi Kelly

      That’s a great question! Stevia leaf contains zero sugar and carbohydrates, yet is 300 times sweeter than cane sugar. Some people don’t like the distinctive taste of stevia, and it can be tricky working out how much to use when substituting it for sugar in recipes. You need very little stevia powder to sweeten a mixture compared to sugar, so some experimenting is usually necessary.

      On the other hand coconut sugar can be substituted 1:1 for cane sugar in recipes, so is much easier to use. Although it is a type of sugar, cane sugar is low on the Glycaemic Index (35) and helps stabilise blood sugar levels – a huge advantage. Both coconut sugar and stevia contribute nutrients to the body and help reduce carbohydrate cravings. I’ve tried using both as sugar substitutes in baking and personally I’d opt for coconut sugar every time – it’s so much easier knowing how much to use, and the taste and texture are great.

      kind regards
      Carolyn

    • Hi Kelly

      That’s a great question! Stevia leaf contains zero sugar and carbohydrates, yet is 300 times sweeter than cane sugar. Some people don’t like the distinctive taste of stevia, and it can be tricky working out how much to use when substituting it for sugar in recipes. You need very little stevia powder to sweeten a mixture compared to sugar, so some experimenting is usually necessary.

      On the other hand coconut sugar can be substituted 1:1 for cane sugar in recipes, so is much easier to use. Although it is a type of sugar, cane sugar is low on the Glycaemic Index (35) and helps stabilise blood sugar levels – a huge advantage. Both coconut sugar and stevia contribute nutrients to the body and help reduce carbohydrate cravings. I’ve tried using both as sugar substitutes in baking and personally I’d opt for coconut sugar every time – it’s so much easier knowing how much to use, and the taste and texture are great.

      kind regards
      Carolyn

  • This article is very useful info. It is the best way to improve the bone growth, kidney function and cell growth. Thank you for sharing.